Scars

BRIEF DESCRIPTION

Scars are a consequence of the surgery. Hence, consider your priorities between living with them after surgery or further living with the feature that awakened in you the desire of undergoing a plastic surgery.
Every effort will be undertaken to let scars as under cover as possible. However, they will still be there.
Individually different evolutions are due to hereditary, hormonal and local factors, the treated area, skin thickness, toxic substances, etc. However, it should be stressed that the full patient’s cooperation during the postoperative process is also very important for accomplishing a good outcome.

The healing process of the scars includes 3 stages:

IMMEDIATE PERIOD (until the 30th day after surgery)
The scar looks excellent and discrete. Some cases show a mild reaction to the stitches or dressing.

MEDIATE PERIOD (from the 30th day up to the 8th or 12th month after surgery)
There is a natural scar thickening, tonality changes, from “red” to “brown”, and then gradually clearing. This period is the least favorable scar healing stage, where the most patients’ concerns arise. Since we cannot hasten the natural healing process, we recommend patients not to worry, because the late period will manage reducing the scar remains.

LATE PERIOD (from the 12th up to the 18th month after surgery)
The scar starts becoming clearer and less consistent, thus reaching its final appearance. Any assessment of the final outcome should be only taken after this period. Although most patients show mature scars already within the first 12 months, some experience modifications of the healing aspect even after the 18th month. Some patients are prone to develop hypertrophic scars or keloids. This tendency can be assessed to some extent during the initial consultation. Generally, dark-skinned people are more predisposed to keloid or hypertrophic scarring. This, however, is not an absolute rule. If the final scar appearance is not sufficiently favorable (unaesthetic scarring – hypertrophic scars, keloids), after expiration of all evolutionary stages, patient and physician can discuss the best corrective conduct, including surgical and/or non-surgical procedures.

Some patients are prone to develop hypertrophic scars or keloids. This tendency can be assessed to some extent during the initial consultation. Generally, dark-skinned people are more predisposed to keloid or hypertrophic scarring. This, however, is not an absolute rule.
If the final scar appearance is not sufficiently favorable (unaesthetic scarring – hypertrophic scars, keloids), after expiration of all evolutionary stages, patient and physician can discuss the best corrective conduct, including surgical and/or non-surgical procedures.